Beta Carotene

Overview

Beta carotene is an orange pigment found in plants that is then converted into vitamin A. It’s an antioxidant that has beneficial effects in protecting against oxidative damage including that caused by UV light. It has been shown to stimulate a number of immune system processes including: increasing the number of immune cells such as B and T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Beta carotene also plays a part in protecting macrophages, which are white blood cells that engulf and destroy foreign substances within the body.


Function

Protection from Cancer: Research suggests that low levels of beta carotene increase the risk to develop certain types of cancer, including lung, stomach, breast, prostate, colon, ovary and cervix. Studies have shown that those with cancer have been shown to have lower dietary/ low blood levels of beta carotene compared to those without cancer.

Protection against heart disease and stroke: Several studies have suggested high dietary beta carotene intake can protect against cardiovascular disease. As an antioxidant, beta carotene has been shown to inhibit some oxidative damage to cholesterol and protect against plaque formation. Beta carotene can reduce the oxidation of LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol.

Autoimmune disease: In a study conducted by Johns Hopkins University looked at the relationship between beta carotene and rheumatoid arthritis. The results of the study showed that disease sufferers had significantly lower blood concentrations of beta carotene than those without the disorder.

Wound healing: Since beta carotene has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, it can help heal wounds and lower oxidative stress.

Vision: Free radical damage is a partial cause of formation of cataracts, and because beta carotene has antioxidant properties it may have a protecting effect on the eye by reducing the damage cause by cataracts.

Mental functioning: In a 1996 Dutch study, researchers looked into the effect of foods rich in beta carotene had on memory impairment and mental functioning and found that it had a protecting effect on the mind. In a second study done in 1997 by Swiss researchers a similar effect was found, higher beta carotene levels were found in those who had scored higher on their recall and recognition test.

Women’s health: Lower levels of beta carotene have been seen in the cells of women with vaginal candidiasis (thrush). A study done in the United States found significantly lower levels of beta carotene in the women who had vaginal candidiasis.


Forms Available


Recommended Intake

Dosage

 

For  erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), a genetic disorder affecting the protein in red blood cells that carry oxygen

  • 1 to 4 years old: 60-90 milligrams (mg)
  • 5 to 8 years old: 90-120 mg
  • 9 to 12 years old: 120-150 mg
  • 13 to 16 years old: 150-180 mg
  • 16 years old and older: 180 mg

 

The dosage can be increased 30-60 mg per day if sensitivity to sunlight persists for those younger than 16 years old and no more than 300 mg per day for those older than 16 years old.

 

For preventing sunburn

  • 25 mg orally per day

 

For age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common eye condition in people 50 years old and older that affects the macula, the part of the eye that provides clear, sharp images

  • 15 mg daily of beta-carotene
  • 500 mg daily of Vitamin C
  • 80 mg of zinc oxide daily
  • 400 International Units (IU) of Vitamin E daily

 

Official recommended intake values have not been determined because there is currently not enough research.


 


Deficiency

Some cancers, a weakened immune system, tissue damage, and heart disease may develop if a deficiency in beta-carotene is long term.  Symptoms include dry skin, difficulty seeing at night, and a higher susceptibility to infection, much like Vitamin E deficiency symptoms.


Sources in the Diet

Beta carotene is found in many fruits and vegetables, especially those that are yellow, red, and deep green.


Recent Studies and Articles

The relationship between beta carotene intake and lung cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10359235

The importance of beta carotene

http://www.naturalnews.com/037933_beta_carotene_carotenoids_foods.html

Beta carotene treating retinis pigmentosa

http://www.naturalnews.com/030218_beta_carotene_retinitis_pigmentosa.html


Challenges Presented


Watson Products

BETA CAROTENE 30% , 15KG/33LB DRUM
BETA CAROTENE 1% SD ,25LB FOIL/POLY CARTON
~~BETA CAROT 22% , 15KG PLASTIC JUG IN CARTN
BETA CAROTENE 1% FF , DP-21,22 LB (10 KG)CARTON
BETA CAROTENE 15% SD , 25 LB DP2 + LINER
BETA CAROTENE 30% TOC, 6 X 1KG CARTON
BETA CAROTENE 5% LD , 40LB PAIL/5 GAL. HEDWIN
BETA CAR.30% 6X1KG/C , 6 X 1KG CARTON
BETA CAROTENE 22% NON GMO 15KG PLASTIC JUG IN CTN
BETA CAROTENE 22% NON GMO 15KG PLASTIC JUG IN CTN
BETA CAROTENE 15%, 35.2 GRAM/FOIL POUCH 100/CTN
BETA CAROTENE 1% SD, 25 LB FOIL/POLYCTN (NEUTRAL TAMPERTAPE)
F080650 BETA CAROTINE 15% WITH MICRO, 25 LB CTN


Sources

  1. [0] – http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/999.html
  2. [0] – http://www.fda.gov/ForIndustry/DevelopingProductsforRareDiseasesConditions/
  3. [0] – http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/
  4. [0] – http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/999.html#OtherNames
  5. [] – Boyle, Marie A. and Anderson Sara L. Personal Nutrition. 7th ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning; 2007
  6. [] – Nelms, M. Sucher, K. Lacey, K. Roth, S. Nutrition Therapy & Pathophysiology. 2 ed. New York, NY: Cengage Learning; 2011.
  7. [] – Reavley N. The New Encyclopedia of Vitamins, Minerals, Supplements and Herbs. New York, NY: M. Evans and Company, Inc.; 1998.
  8. [] – Dole Nutrition Institute. The Dole Nutrition Handbook. Printed in the United States of America; Rodale Inc. 2010.
  9. [0] – http://www.vitamins-supplements.org/beta-carotene.php