Calcium

Chemical Symbol

Ca


Overview

Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the human body. Ninety-nine percent of the body’s calcium is stored within the teeth and bones. The remaining one percent is found within the blood lymph and other body fluids within the cells. The functions calcium provides for the body are so important to survival that the body may begin to demineralize bone in order to maintain calcium levels.


Function

Bones and teeth: the main function of calcium is in the development and maintenance of teeth and bones. Bone is a progressive tissue that is constantly being remodeled throughout our lifespan. Cells in the bones called osteoclasts begin this remodeling process by dissolving and reabsorbing bone. Then the bone forming cells called osteoblasts begin to create new bone to replace the bone that was dissolved.

Nervous system: Calcium plays a role in the constriction and relaxation of blood vessels, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction and secretion of hormones like insulin.

Cardiovascular system and blood: Calcium, sodium, potassium and magnesium all interact to regulate blood pressure and water balance within our bodies. Calcium plays a role in the activation of prothrombin, which is a key component of our blood clotting process.


Forms Available


Recommended Intake

Infants

  • Up to 6 months: 200 milligrams per day (mg/day)
  • 7 to 12 months: 260 mg/dya

 

Children and Adolescents

  • 1 to 3 years old: 700 mg/day
  • 4 to 8 years old: 1,000 mg/day
  • 9 to 18 years old: 1,300 mg/day

 

Adults

  • 19 to 50 years old: 1,000 mg/day
  • 50 to 70 years old (Males): 1,000 mg/day
  • 50 to 70 years old (Women): 1,200 mg/day

 

 

Women Pregnant and Lactating

  • 14 to 18 years old: 1,300 mg/day
  • 19 to 50 years old: 1,000 mg/day

Deficiency

Mild calcium deficiencies can cause some nerve sensitivity, muscle twitching, brittle nails, irritability, palpitations and insomnia. If a calcium deficiency gets worse it can cause an abnormal heart beat, muscle pains or cramping, numbness and stiffness in hands and feet and depression. For children who have a calcium deficiency they may develop rickets, crawling and walking, insomnia, bone deformities, and retardation in growth. In adults, calcium deficiencies can lead to osteomalacia with some symptoms of muscle weakness, bone pain or abnormally slow healing fractures.


Sources in the Diet

Most good sources of calcium come from milk, cheese, yogurt and other dairy products. You can also get your daily intake of calcium by eat a variety of fruits, vegetable and fish like kale, canned fish, peanuts, walnuts, broccoli, cauliflower, and soybeans. Some companies have been making fruit juices, bread and cereals that are fortified with calcium like orange juices.

 

Source of Calcium Amount of Calcium
8 oz milk 300 mg
2 oz Swiss cheese 530 mg
6 oz yogurt 300 mg
2 oz sardines with bones 240 mg
6 oz cooked turnip greens 220 mg calcium
3 oz almonds 210 mg calcium

Recent Studies and Articles

Calcium and women’s health

http://www.nutraingredients.com/Product-Categories/Minerals/Calcium-supplements-linked-to-lower-death-risk-for-women-Study

Calcium and osteoporosis

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/05/25/calcium-doesnt-stop-osteoporosis/

Calcium and iron interactions

http://www.fortitech.com/research/supplemental-calcium-iron-interactions-new-findings/


Challenges Presented

  • Flavor
  • Texture
  • pH impact

Watson Products

CALCIUM CARB. 70% , 44LB BAGS
CALCIUM CARB. 90% DC , 55LB (25KG) CARTON
CALCIUM POLYCARB 87% , 200 LB DRUM
CALCIUM CARB 90AM LL , 55LB (25KG) CARTON
CALCIUM CARB 90/250A , 55LB (25KG) CARTON
CALCIUM PRO 80%, 50LB BAG
CALCIUM CARBONATE 75%, A&Z, 110 LB DRUM
CALCIUM CARBONATE 90% WITH MICRO, 55 LB (25KG) CTN
D-CALCIUM PANTOTHENATE 85% W/EC 25LB CTN


Sources

  1. [0] – http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002412.htm
  2. [0] – An Evidence-based Approach to Vitamins and Minerals
  3. [0] – http://djarn.edublogs.org/files/2011/01/periodic-table-2jh1745.gif
  4. [] – Hendler S., Rorvik D., Fleming T.,et al. Physicians’ Desk Reference for Nutritional Supplements. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company, Inc.; 2001.
  5. [] – Reavley N. The New Encyclopedia of Vitamins, Minerals, Supplements and Herbs. New York, NY: M. Evans and Company, Inc.; 1998.
  6. [] – Nelms, M. Sucher, K. Lacey, K. Roth, S. Nutrition Therapy & Pathophysiology. 2 ed. New York, NY: Cengage Learning; 2011.
  7. [] – Higdon J., Drake V., An Evidence-based Approach to Vitamins and Minerals. New York, NY: Thieme Publishing Group.; 2012
  8. [] – Boyle, Marie A. and Anderson Sara L. Personal Nutrition. 7th ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning; 2007.